Fresh Gardens for those Who Love Gardens : (Lots! of) Images of Inspiration from MIFGS 2015

 

Have you ever noticed that if there is one consistent characteristic

of a Garden Lover

it's the desire to share: the beauty, the knowledge, the produce, even the cuttings...

 
There are no happier folks than plant lovers and none more generous than those who garden.
— Ernest Henry Wilson, plant collector, 1876 ~ 1930
 
mifgs 2015 gold winner

 

So perhaps that's part of the reason why

Garden Festivals & Shows are so popular,

the world over.

Fellow Garden Lovers can assemble together, nod appreciatively,

garner inspiration and simply admire the beauty of the most basic of human arts:

the art of cultivation...

 

No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden
— Thomas Jefferson
So happy that dahlias are back in fashion...which means they are back in the florist shops...and the nurseries...These beauties are from The Road Stall in Spring St: my absolute favourite florist in Melbourne for their use of locally grown leaves & flowers, and for the freshness of their blooms. I think my husband possibly keeps them in business.... 

So happy that dahlias are back in fashion...which means they are back in the florist shops...and the nurseries...These beauties are from The Road Stall in Spring St: my absolute favourite florist in Melbourne for their use of locally grown leaves & flowers, and for the freshness of their blooms. I think my husband possibly keeps them in business.... 

 

It's no secret to regular Glamour Drops readers

just how much I love going to the annual

Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show

each Autumn, 

and just how much I love to share the inspirational images which I find there.

It's an almost-overwhelming visual feast of colour, texture & vibrancy.

 

My husband has learnt that no fewer than 4 hours will ever be spent 

at this glorious event each year...

(There tends to be a bit of bribery involved to keep him patient:

ice cream, coffee, corn on the cob, wine, the usual suspects....)

 
How wonderful is the expression of delighted admiration on this gentleman's face? His expression mirrored that of most of the visitors to the garden show this year. 

How wonderful is the expression of delighted admiration on this gentleman's face? His expression mirrored that of most of the visitors to the garden show this year. 

Another of my Local Heroes: Joost...the man's imagination, common sense and optimism for the future is boundless. Growing fabulous flowers is just one of the many parts of this modern day Renaissance Man...If you haven't heard of him, do look him up! 

Another of my Local Heroes: Joost...the man's imagination, common sense and optimism for the future is boundless. Growing fabulous flowers is just one of the many parts of this modern day Renaissance Man...If you haven't heard of him, do look him up! 

Noting more and more burgundy toned leaves appearing in garden design over the last few years. It's a trend I personally love. 

Noting more and more burgundy toned leaves appearing in garden design over the last few years. It's a trend I personally love. 

A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness; it teaches industry and thrift; above all it teaches entire trust.
— Gertrude Jekyll

 

So if you weren't able to attend this 4 day transformation of the charming

Carlton Gardens which flank the oh-so-fabulous Royal Exhibition Building,

then fear not, as I hope these little glimpses of glamorous gardens

which appeared, as if by Fairy-Magic, in the park last week,

shall create some garden inspiration magic of their own....

 


Equilibrium by Nathan Burkett Design....


 
The earth laughs in flowers.
— Ralph Waldo Emerson
Crossroads Garden by Ian Barker Gardens won Gold, and showcased the more naturalistic trend of landscaping. This garden was very popular with the bees as well as the visitors! It was very tranquil. 

Crossroads Garden by Ian Barker Gardens won Gold, and showcased the more naturalistic trend of landscaping. This garden was very popular with the bees as well as the visitors! It was very tranquil. 

 

THE NOTABLE TRENDS FROM MIFGS 2015:-

 

Leaves in russet, burgundy and all shades of red. Flowers in red too!

 

"Naturalistic" planting - much less of the hard edged architectural style linear gardens,
replaced with softened edges of plants falling over the borders.

 

Large leaves.

 

Flowers, flowers, flowers. (Nice to see them back.)

Incorporating lots of recycled materials, like concrete pipes,

or old plumbing pipes.

 

Colour - (welcome back to colour too).

 

Mixing edibles in with ornamentals in the same garden bed.

 

Espalier fruit trees. (A favourite here on Glamour Drops.)

 

Indigenous Planting - the variety of which obviously depends on the location,

but a greater awareness of the importance of using local species for the 

continued cross-pollination of flowers by native insects.
 


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The Beekeeper's Garden by Jenny Smith...

This thoughtful garden won a Silver Medal, although I would personally have awarded it a Gold Medal because of the importance of highlighting the current issues facing bees around the world, through increased use of agricultural chemicals and lack of flowers. This is an issue we can all do something about, by simply planting more flowers in our gardens and thinking about where our food comes from. 

Planting native species in our gardens and communities is increasingly important, because indigenous insects, birds and wildlife rely on them. Over thousands, and sometimes millions, of years they have co-evolved to live in local climate and soil conditions.
— David Suzuki

 

Fashioned by Flowers...The RMIT Fashion student competition....


 
MIFGS 2015 SALVIA.jpg
Poppies knitted by locals for the 100 year anniversary of the Gallipoli Landing on April 25, 1914. The poppies were "planted" in an otherwise indigenous garden of Eucalpytus, Banksias and Grevilleas.

Poppies knitted by locals for the 100 year anniversary of the Gallipoli Landing on April 25, 1914. The poppies were "planted" in an otherwise indigenous garden of Eucalpytus, Banksias and Grevilleas.

 

Thousands and thousands of people have passed through this 

glorious building each year at the MIFG Show, 

some to gain knowledge, some to gain inspiration,

and some to simply drink in all the beauty of the wonders of plants.

 

 

As plants are our single most precious resource on the planet,

without whom we could not breathe, eat or survive,

a passion for plants is certainly something worth sharing.